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US0005D. The Salt Mine: A Digital Atlas of Salt Tectonics - Downloadable Version

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US0005D

US0005D. The Salt Mine: A Digital Atlas of Salt Tectonics, by M. R. Hudec and M. P. A. Jackson. Bureau of Economic Geology Udden Book Series No. 5 and AAPG Memoir 99. 305 p., 400 images, 40 animations, 2011. Downloadable (1.7 GB zip folder) version issued March 2020. ISBN: 978-0-615-51836-7.

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US0005D. The Salt Mine: A Digital Atlas of Salt Tectonics, by M. R. Hudec and M.P. A. Jackson. Bureau of Economic Geology Udden Series No. 5 and AAPG Memoir 99. 305 p., 400 images, 40 animations, 2011. Downloadable version (1.7 GB zip folder) version issued March 2020. 





About This Publication
This publication helps scientists quickly sort through the entire spectrum of knowledge of salt tectonics, isolate relevant information, and find pathways to more-detailed information. Included in the zip file is an interactive atlas of salt structures and associated sediment geometries that contains more than 1,300 annotated images of salt structures, with detailed captions that discuss key principles. All images are grouped into structural styles on the basis of a geometric classification and include field exposures (outcrop views, geologic maps, aerial photographs, and satellite images), seismic sections, geologic cross sections, conceptual sketches, and animations.


Keywords: salt, salt tectonics, atlases, Salt Mine

 

Chapter 1 - Salt Pillows and Salt Anticlines

Chapter 2 - Salt Stocks and Salt Walls

Chapter 3 - Triangular Diapirs

Chapter 4 - Indented Diapirs

Chapter 5 - Extensional Salt Detachments

Chapter 6 - Contractional Salt Detachments

Chapter 7 - Salt Sheets

Chapter 8 - Minibasins

Chapter 9 - Roho Systems

Chapter 10 - Counterregional Systems

Chapter 11 - Location Maps

Glossary

References and Figure Credits

Subject Index

Geographic Index

Michael Hudec

Michael Hudec is a structural geologist with degrees from Amherst College, the University of Southern California, and the University of Wyoming. He worked 8 years at Exxon Production Research, and 3 years at Baylor University and for the past 10 years has worked at the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, where he is co-director of the Applied Geodynamics Laboratory, an industry-funded consortium studying salt tectonics. His current research interests include palinspastic restoration of salt structures, salt-sheet- emplacement mechanisms, and early history of the Gulf of Mexico salt basin.


Martin Jackson

Martin Jackson is a structural geologist with degrees from the University of London and the University of Cape Town. His outcrop-based research on salt tectonics in the Paradox Basin (Utah), Sverdrup basin (Arctic Canada), Katangan Copperbelt (central Africa), Great Kavir (Iran), Haute Provence (France), and Mars has been complemented by subsurface studies in the Gulf of Mexico, East Texas Basin, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Biscay, Red Sea (Yemen), offshore Angola, offshore Gabon, and offshore Brazil and by physical modeling at the Applied Geodynamics Laboratory (Austin) and the Hans Ramberg Tectonic Laboratory (Uppsala). He founded and co-directs the Applied Geodynamics Laboratory.

Salt Mine 1
Salt Mine 2
Salt Mine 3
Salt Mine 4
Salt Mine 5